Exciting New Technology

As we turn the corner and head in to the last two months of 2017, it’s worth taking a look at what the DZ team (and our customers) are most excited about it terms of new technology. There are various stages to the technology cycle, but for purposes of this post, I’m really thinking about tech that companies are adopting now which impacts daily business operations.

Here, (in no particular order), are three that I think are worth mentioning:

All-Flash-Isilon

Dell EMC is shipping all-flash Isilon storage systems (Product Code “F800”) and we have installed our first few. At this point, there is a pretty mature block AFA (all-flash-array) market from a wide variety of OEMs. We’ve also seen lots of really fast NAS which has plenty of real-life applications (VMWare over NFS, limited edge-cases where DB over NAS protocols makes sense, enterprise apps, home directories, small-file I/O on NAS, just to name a few). What we haven’t seen is Enterprise NAS that breaks the real-time “wide-stream” throughput barrier so effectively. One of our clients, a52, was even kind enough to do a case study with us. We have had some adoption by other customers and as the price of flash media becomes more affordable, the form factor, power savings, and blazing fast performance of all-flash NAS is something we’re super excited about.

SD-WAN

DZ’s Manager of Cloud, Network and Security, Ryan Jensen gave a really cool presentation on Software-Defined Wide Area Networks (or SD-WAN) and some real-life use cases at one of our events the other night. SD-WAN really is a game changer, and it’s for sure the thing our Networking team is being asked about more than anything else, other than possibly security. SD-WAN provides a whole host of benefits, but the most obvious is the ability for anyone with multiple geographic locations to use broadband at a significantly lower cost than MPLS circuits. For those already using broadband instead of MPLS, SD-WAN provides a whole new way to deliver better performance as well as near real-time intelligence on the circuit quality (which historically has been something we’ve had to rely on the circuit providers for). There are pure-play companies doing SD-WAN (notably Viptela, recently acquired by Cisco) and some WAN optimization folks bolting it on very successfully (like SilverPeak’s SD-WAN offerings). I would expect over the next few years that almost every organization with multiple locations will adopt SD-WAN in one form or another. Think “VMWare but for internet”.

AntiVirus For MacOS

I run MacOS, as do more and more folks these days. iOS – well, we all know what that is. If we’re not running it on our phone, perhaps we have an iPad, or we have someone close to us that’s using it. Historically, other than MS Office Macros, MacOS has not been a frequent target for computer viruses. As security becomes a bigger concern for all of us, and there are even (unconfirmed) rumors that MacOS and iOS may become one operating system someday, Macintosh clients without virus protection are definitely becoming a big liability on computer networks. Take a look at this article about a Russian Remote Access Trojan (RAT) posted to the download mirror site for the popular Handbrake application for Mac – There are more AntiVirus players for Mac out there than ever before, but we really like Palo Alto Networks’ “Traps” – many of our customers are already using PAN’s Next Generation Firewall products, so this is an easy add-on. Learn more about Traps in the article.

There’s been lots to see this year, and 2018 will bring even more, we can all be sure of that. It should be noted that the descriptions above are just a high-level overview, and the DZ Staff has lots more to share on the topic(s) if you are interested. What new stuff did you adopt this year, and what are you considering for next year? We want to know, and if you’re a current DZ customer, there’s a good chance you’ll receive a survey from us on the subject. if you have time, please help us out and complete it, we would really appreciate it!

Signing Off,

—Tom G.